New York State Education Department I State Office of Religious and Independent Schools I Catapult Learning

Soaring into 2022!

Happy and Healthy New Year from the Long Island PDRC!

 
As we start 2022, no one thought we would still be facing remote learning and/or hybrid learning environments. Although challenging, the new year also brings endless opportunities for reassessing and refocusing our energies towards positive thinking and a growth mindset. Whether you are a teacher or a school leader, the new year is a perfect time to reflect on your impact for learning in 2022. Take time to identify the school-based SMART goals that you would address this year and, to hold yourself accountable, write them down and revisit them regularly and consistently.

What are your 3 big priorities for this school year?

The Power of Peer-to-Peer Coaching: A PLC Program for Success

A Model for Peer Collaboration, Professional Growth and School Improvement

The Long Island PDRC and the Upstate PDRC are pleased to offer an exciting opportunity, The Power of Peer-to-Peer Coaching. This program has been intentionally designed to prepare school leaders and teachers to become Peer-to-Peer coaches through an Art of Coaching lens.  Starting Tuesday, March 8, the program is structured in two parts:

Part I: The Power of Peer-to-Peer Coaching: The Why, The What, and The How

Part II: The Application of Peer-to-Peer Coaching: PDRC Support of Implementation

For schools and/or educators interested in enrolling in this this program, please email the Long Island PDRC Director, Rita Stavrou (rita.stavrou@catapultlearning.com) for more information.

Literacy in Action

Research-based Practices

 

How do you design and implement effective math interventions? Our guest presenter, Dr. Nicki, author of over 30 books, will share practical, realistic strategies and differentiated activities to provide scaffolded access to grade-level standards.

Join this 5-part series to focus on research-based strategies to deepen your literacy toolbox! Sessions are offered on Tuesdays at 3pm. Topics include Reading and the Brain, Understanding Sounds to Understanding Complex Text, When Students Need Something Different and more!

Session meets every Tuesday from 3pm-4pm, starting January 18. 

Math for Everyone: Effective Interventions to Support All Learners with Dr. Nicki

Back by Popular Demand!

 

How do you design and implement effective math interventions? Our guest presenter, Dr. Nicki, author of over 30 books, will share practical, realistic strategies and differentiated activities to provide scaffolded access to grade-level standards.

Session meets every Thursday from 4pm-5pm, starting January 20.

A Writing PLC

A Collins Writing Program Cohort

 

Strengthening Writing and Thinking Skills Across the Curriculum Grs. 3-12. Join this structured PLC to strengthen your students’ learning, cognitive engagement and critical thinking skills using writing. This unique virtual opportunity will consist of 30 mins of strategies and 30 mins of implementation Q&A. Come join for one or for all sessions.

Session meets on the First Monday of the month, 3:30pm-4:30pm.

Leadership Corner

Prioritizing Habits

By Mitch Center

As we look to the new year, we face a fresh beginning with boundless potential. We make promises to ourselves about what we will do differently and how we will be better – both personally and professionally – as we make New Year’s Resolutions and promises to ourselves.

To make resolutions that stick, we need to be able to identify what’s important – in other words, what your priorities are – and we need to find a way to successfully incorporate new habits or ways of behaving into our routines.

Whether we are resolving to make changes in our personal or professional life, consider what James Clear teaches us in Atomic Habits: Tiny Changes, Remarkable Results.

~Mitch Center provides leadership professional development and coaching for Catapult Learning and is a monthly contributor to our Leadership Corner Conversation.

Continue Reading

Following are five suggestions for you to carry into your life, and that you could easily share with teachers, staff and students:

Start with an Incredibly Small Habit: Identify a habit so small and easy, you can’t not do it. 

Personal Example: If you want to commit to meditating 20 minutes / day, start with just one minute a day.

Professional Example: If you want to observe 3 teachers / day for 20 minutes each, try visiting 3 teachers for just 5 minutes each.

Increase your habit in very small ways: The author describes the compounding power of 1% – add just 1% / day until you get where you want to within a few months. What happens is your will power and motivation will increase as you gradually extend your time and work it into your routing, which will help make the habit stick.

Break Big Habits Down: By chunking your habits – say, meditating for ten minutes in the morning and ten minutes in the evening – you make the habit more attainable and easier to absorb in your life. If you know you need to spend an hour a day dedicated to communicating with families via email, rather than checking and responding all day throughout the day or for a dedicated hour in the morning, try breaking it into two 30-minute chunks.

When you slip, get back on track quick: We’ve all experienced this – with exercise, diets, or other habits we’ve tried to start. We slip, and then consciously or not we let the habit fade away. The author reminds us, “Never miss twice.” It is too easy to break a new habit, so keep this phrase handy to keep yourself on track.

Be Patient and Stick to a Pace You Could Sustain: Sustainability is crucial, and progress comes with patience and the consistent practice. But go slow, and probably slower than you think. Add time to your meditation and classroom observations slowly, and be willing to decrease time if where you are headed feels unsustainable. There is no use in developing a habit that is overly burdensome or unrealistic, so be patient with yourself and the habit until it becomes as routine as brushing your teeth.

If 2021 taught us anything, it’s that life is unpredictable. Let’s let 2022 be the year not where we can predict and control everything, but where we discover or rediscover our own personal power to make real and meaningful changes in our lives. Happy New Year, everyone!

Community Spotlight

Long Island Students Share Their New Year Goals

~ Play math games instead of video games – Anonymous student

~ I want to learn how to write my name – George (age 3)

~ I struggle with multiplication. I want to memorize all of my facts – Julia (age 8)

~ Have better study habits like doing my homework before dinner – Anonymous student

Setting Attainable SMART Goals with Students

One part of goal setting for kids is teaching our students to reflect on things they do well and things they need to improve on. Another part is teaching students what a goal is, how to pick the right one, and making a step-by-step plan to achieve the goal that they set. This can be done at home and at school.

Parents can support with their children with learning goals. Parents can have daily conversations and check-ins with their children to see how things are going and may find special checklists or charts helpful in keeping their children on track, along with certain incentives to maintain their children’s interest.

Teachers are useful in providing an approach to goal-setting that is age-appropriate and systematic and age-appropriate. Teachers can set a few times in the year to reflect on, set, and plan for achieving goals.

You can start by discussing the things that children feel they do well. Brainstorm these ideas on a chart or whiteboard. This is a positive way to start the goal-setting process because they are thinking of things they have achieved and learned already. Discuss how these things make them feel. Encourage children to recall how they went about learning those things.

~ Ms. S. Teacher, Suffolk County

Tips for Remote Learning: Set a learning schedule that allows for flexibility

One part of goal setting for kids is teaching our students to reflect on things they do well and things they need to improve on. Another part is teaching students what a goal is, how to pick the right one, and making a step-by-step plan to achieve the goal that they set. This can be done at home and at school.

Parents can support with their children with learning goals. Parents can have daily conversations and check-ins with their children to see how things are going and may find special checklists or charts helpful in keeping their children on track, along with certain incentives to maintain their children’s interest.

Teachers are useful in providing an approach to goal-setting that is age-appropriate and systematic and age-appropriate. Teachers can set a few times in the year to reflect on, set, and plan for achieving goals.

You can start by discussing the things that children feel they do well. Brainstorm these ideas on a chart or whiteboard. This is a positive way to start the goal-setting process because they are thinking of things they have achieved and learned already. Discuss how these things make them feel. Encourage children to recall how they went about learning those things.

~ Ms. S. Teacher, Suffolk County

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